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In Her Words - Feedback on GUIU's Girls Training in SRHR

This is the second in a three part series focusing on economic empowerment, sexual and reproductive health, and general leadership learnings shared by our Girl Up Club members.

In the two primary schools Girl Up Initiative Uganda works in, sexual and reproductive healthand rights (SRHR) isn't a subject that's part of the formal school curriculum. For both genders, understanding the changes a body goes through during puberty and menstruation, how to take care of oneself to stay healthy and, most importantly, how to avoid pregnancy, are critical topics to be covered.

For the girls we work with, education on sexual and reproductive health and rights can improve confidence levels, self-esteem, overall health and well-being, and ensure they graduate from primary school. Understanding what a good touch and bad touch are, speaking up in cases of sexual violence, realizing their value as girls, and learning how to handle menstruation and other bodily changes are all topics that are addressed by our SRHR educator during our training sessions.

Misinformation on how a woman becomes pregnant leads to unintended consequences, resulting in teenage pregnancies and increased school dropout rates. Lack of financial resources also limits girls ability to handle menstruation and stay in school during her menstruation, which is why we have included training in making reusable sanitary pads in our program.

What Our Girls Had to Say

We asked our participants what they have learned since becoming Girl Up girls. These are some of the responses we received on the topic of sexual and reproductive health and rights:

Naigaga Florence (11 years old)

"Girl Up has taught me how to use pads both the non-reusable ones and the reusable ones that we learnt how to make in the club."

Elizabeth Uwase (12 years old)

"I learnt about body changes especially the adolescence stage of growth."

Akutu Christine (14 years old)

"I have learnt to be confident in the society and also to stay away from boys. I know how to make pads which I can use during menstruation and also how to protect myself."

Nabakiki Brenda

"I have learnt to protect my life by abstaining from sex to stay alive and be successful."

In Her Words - Feedback on GUIU's Girls Training in SRHR

November 10, 2015

This is the second in a three part series focusing on economic empowerment, sexual and reproductive health, and general leadership learnings shared by our Girl Up Club members.

In the two primary schools Girl Up Initiative Uganda works in, sexual and reproductive healthand rights (SRHR) isn't a subject that's part of the formal school curriculum. For both genders, understanding the changes a body goes through during puberty and menstruation, how to take care of oneself to stay healthy and, most importantly, how to avoid pregnancy, are critical topics to be covered.

For the girls we work with, education on sexual and reproductive health and rights can improve confidence levels, self-esteem, overall health and well-being, and ensure they graduate from primary school. Understanding what a good touch and bad touch are, speaking up in cases of sexual violence, realizing their value as girls, and learning how to handle menstruation and other bodily changes are all topics that are addressed by our SRHR educator during our training sessions.

Misinformation on how a woman becomes pregnant leads to unintended consequences, resulting in teenage pregnancies and increased school dropout rates. Lack of financial resources also limits girls ability to handle menstruation and stay in school during her menstruation, which is why we have included training in making reusable sanitary pads in our program.

What Our Girls Had to Say

We asked our participants what they have learned since becoming Girl Up girls. These are some of the responses we received on the topic of sexual and reproductive health and rights:

Naigaga Florence (11 years old)

"Girl Up has taught me how to use pads both the non-reusable ones and the reusable ones that we learnt how to make in the club."

Elizabeth Uwase (12 years old) "I learnt about body changes especially the adolescence stage of growth."